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  • Sunday, October 28, 2012 12:31 PM | Anonymous member
    AIC-CERT
    American Institute for Conservation - Collections Emergency Response Team


    WASHINGTON, D.C.undefined With Hurricane Sandy threatening the East Coast, museums, historic sites, libraries, and archives in much of the Eastern United States will be at risk. The American Institute for Conservation (AIC), the national association of conservation professionals, is offering free emergency response assistance to cultural organizations. Please help make sure that staff members of collecting institutions know to contact AIC-CERT when a disasterundefinedflooding, hurricane, earthquake, fireundefinedhas damaged collections.

    Call AIC’s 24-hour assistance number at 202.661.8068 for advice by phone.

    Call 202.661.8068 to arrange for a team to come to the site to complete damage assessments and help with salvage organization.

    AIC-CERT volunteers have provided assistance and advice to dozens of museums, libraries, and archives since 2007. AIC-CERT teams were on the ground following Tropical Storm Irene and flooding in Minot, North Dakota in 2011, the Midwest floods in 2008, and in the Galveston area following Hurricane Ike later that year. AIC-CERT members and other AIC conservators participated in an 18-month-long project in Haiti assisting with recovery of cultural materials damaged in the 2010 earthquake.

    AIC-CERT is supported and managed by the Foundation of the American Institute for Conservation (FAIC). In 2007 and again in 2010, FAIC received funding from the Institute of Museum & Library Services to support an advanced training program for conservators and other museum professionals that resulted in a force of 107 “rapid responders” trained to assess damage and initiate salvage of cultural collections after a disaster has occurred. They are ready to assist.

    Resources and information on disaster recovery and salvage can be found on the AIC website at www.conservation-us.org/disaster . The public can also call AIC-CERT at 202.661.8068.

    About AIC
    The American Institute for Conservation of Historic & Artistic Works is the national membership organization supporting the professionals who preserve our cultural heritage. AIC plays a crucial role in establishing and upholding professional standards, promoting research and publications, providing educational opportunities, and fostering the exchange of knowledge among conservators, allied professionals, and the public.
    Learn more about AIC at www.conservation-us.org.

    About FAIC
    The Foundation of the American Institute for Conservation of Historic & Artistic Works supports conservation education, research, and outreach activities that advance the conservation profession nationally and internationally while promoting understanding of our global cultural heritage.
    Learn more about FAIC at www.conservation-us.org/foundation.
  • Friday, October 26, 2012 7:39 AM | Anonymous member
    Hurricane Sandy may bring widespread flooding, storm surges, and dangerous winds to New York. Take your records emergency response plan home and keep contact information for key staff, services, and resources with you at all times. Remember the New York State Archives is available to help. Visit the New York State Archives Disaster Assistance web page for resources and contact information: http://www.archives.nysed.gov/a/records/mr_disaster.shtml

    For more about Hurricane Sandy's path, check your local weather service or the National Weather Service National Hurricane Center.
  • Sunday, October 14, 2012 7:47 AM | Anonymous member
    Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, Open House: “You Are History”

    “What do I do with all this stuff?” is a common question asked when going through family letters, photographs and other personal items. If you have ever asked this question, don’t miss the Schomburg Center’s “You Are History” free event on Sunday, October 14, 2012, 10:00 am - 4:00 pm.

    This is an opportunity to talk with librarians and archivists about personal records and view original materials from the Schomburg Center's vast collections. There will be specialized workshops and a tour of the exhibitions.

    The Schomberg Center for Research in Black Culture is located at 515 Malcolm X Boulevard, New York, NY 10037-1801. No RSVP required. This event is free and open to the public. http://www.nypl.org/locations/tid/64/node/185111?lref=64%2Fcalendar

    This event is part of 2012 New York Archives Week.
  • Friday, October 12, 2012 5:29 AM | Anonymous member
    Ben Alexander, a panel discussion session moderator for the New York Archives Week 2012 Symposium, "Archives and Activism," has put out a call for papers for a special edition of Archival Science: Archiving Activism to be edited by Mr. Alexander and Andrew Flinn.  The special edition will explore connections between archival practice and activism. Mr Alexander let ART know, "We are very interested in a attracting a breadth and depth of proposals." Archival Science is an imprint of Springer.

    Deadline for proposals of 250 words or less is November 15, 2012. Selected authors will be invited to submit a full length manuscript. See the CFP for more information.  

    About the Editors:

    Ben Alexander is an Assistant Professor in the Graduate School of Library and Information Studies at Queens College, The City University of New York, where he also serves as Director of Archival Studies.  In addition to his full time faculty appointment, Alexander also serves as the Head of Special Collections and Archives for the Queens College Libraries.  

    Andrew Flinn is a Senior Lecturer and the Director of the Archives and Records Management (ARM) (including the recently (2102) merged Records and Archive Management (International) (RAMI) MA) program in the Department of Information Studies at University College London (UCL). In 2011 he was the Allen Smith Visiting Scholar in the  Graduate School of Library and Information Studies at Simmons College, Boston, MA.

  • Tuesday, October 09, 2012 11:00 AM | Deleted user

    Franklin Furnace Archive, Inc., Presentation:
    “Project Strategies for Processing Event Documentation"

    Wednesday, October 10, 6:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m.

    FREE, RSVP is required. RSVP to harley@franklinfurnace.org



    Johanna Went, "Twin Travel Terror," 1987


    Martha Wilson, Founding Director of the Franklin Furnace Archive, which focuses on the preservation and celebration of all forms of avant-garde art, will discuss the organization’s recently completed project to create and expand its online event archives, in a program titled "Publishing Franklin Furnace's Second Decade Online: Providing Intellectual Access to Variable Media Art." Michael Katchen, Senior Archivist, will present a guide for digitization, Best Practices and Guidelines: Digitization at Franklin Furnace Archive Inc., which is published on Franklin Furnace's website and is used by other art spaces, such as Hallwalls in Buffalo, and LACE in Los Angeles.

    The online database, the digitization and publication of which was supported by the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Booth Ferris Foundation, contains 11,762 images and associated metadata documenting the organization’s first two decades in operation. The organization is currently looking for funding to digitize and publish its third decade of event records.

    The evening’s events will include an open house and a tour of the archives, followed by a formal presentation and discussion.

    www.franklinfurnace.org

    Location: Franklin Furnace Archive, Inc. 80 Hanson Place, Suite #301, 
    Brooklyn, New York 

    RSVP is required. Up to 20 visitors may be accommodated. 
    RSVP to harley@franklinfurnace.org

    Submitted by Haley Richardson, ART Reporter
  • Monday, October 08, 2012 2:24 PM | Deleted user
    The Manhattan Borough Historian’s Office, the General Society of Mechanics & Tradesmen of the City of New York, and the New York Preservation Archive Project, Presentation and Interview:

    “The Historian as Activist: One Man’s Struggle to Rescue a Forgotten Civic Hero from Obscurity and Disgrace”


    Wednesday, October 10, 6:30 p.m.
    FREE No RSVP Required



    Manhattan Borough Historian Michael Miscione, left, accepts award from 
    the American Friends of the Georgian Group for promoting New York City history and 
    raising awareness for the early historic preservation movement from John Kinnear, 
    President, the Georgian Group, September 26, 2012.
    Photo by: John McKenzie

    A decade ago, Michael Miscione, a television producer for NYC-TV, set out to introduce New Yorkers to the forgotten legacy of Andrew H. Green, whose work as a preservationist and city planner helped to turn their city in to the world-class metropolis it is today. Miscione’s one-man quest to solidify Green’s place in the historical narrative of New York City will be the focus of an in-depth interview and illustrated presentation Wednesday night, as part of the 2012 New York Archives Week celebration. In conversation with Anthony C. Wood, founder of the New York Preservation Archive Project, Miscione will discuss his path to historical activism and his current role as Manhattan Borough Historian, as well as the trials and tribulations of adding another important figure to the long and storied past of New York City.

    "I'm very excited about this interview,” Miscione says. “I seldom get asked about the nuts-and-bolts of the work I've done to promote [Green]. Often those war stories are every bit as interesting as the historical facts. Plus, it will give me a chance to name and thank the people who have helped me along the way."

    Join Michael Miscione and Anthony C. Wood at the General Society Library (20 West 44th Street between Fifth and Sixth Avenues) on Wednesday, October 10, at 6:30pm. This event is free; no RSVP is required.

    Submitted by Haley Richardson, ART Reporter
  • Sunday, October 07, 2012 5:50 PM | Deleted user

    2012 New York Archives Week:
    Guggenheim Museum, Exhibition Tour

    “A Long-Awaited Tribute: Frank Lloyd Wright’s Usonian House and Pavilion”

    Wednesday, October 10, 3:00 p.m.


    Frank Lloyd Wright and David Henken reviewing architectural 
    drawings for the pavilion, 1953. Photo: © Pedro E. Guerrero
    Image via Guggenheim Museum

    Join Francine Snyder, Director of the Library and Archives at the
    Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, for a tour of the Sackler Center for Arts
    Education’s “long-awaited” exhibition of materials documenting Frank Lloyd
    Wright’s first buildings in New York City, including the 1953 exhibition
    pavilion and model Usonian home erected where the Guggenheim Museum now
    stands. “While many of Frank Lloyd Wright's buildings are iconic,” Snyder
    says, “the exhibition pavilion and accompanying Usonian house are not well
    known. It's wonderful to be able to tell this story through materials from
    the archives.”

    The 10,000 square-foot, glass and fiberboard exhibition pavilion and
    attached model Usonian house featured a traveling exhibition of Wright’s
     work and featured sixteen model buildings, photographs, floor plans, and
    drawings. Visitors were invited at the time to enter the fully-furnished home through
    the courtyard of the pavilion to experience the “distinctively American,
    middle-class” furnishings and artwork, which included items designed by
    Wright himself and mobiles constructed by Alexander Calder.

    Web Site: www.guggenheim.org/ and www.guggenheim.org/usonian 
    Location: Guggenheim Museum, Sackler Center, 1071 Fifth Ave, New York, NY 
    RSVP is required. RSVP to archives@guggenheim.org  Limited to 25 participants.

    Tour details sent upon confirmation of RSVP. Tour will be followed by the
    option for participants to visit additional museum galleries on their own.


    Submitted by Haley Richardson, ART Reporter
  • Wednesday, September 26, 2012 5:12 PM | Deleted user

    The Advocacy Committee of the Archivists Round Table of Metropolitan New York, Inc. (ART) supports the Hart Island Project in its effort to provide visibility and access to the New York City public cemetery on Hart’s Island. In particular, ART agrees that the Department of Corrections should make their electronic database of people buried at Hart’s Island since 1977 available on its website, and will submit written testimony in favor of open records at the upcoming New York City Council Committee on Fire and Criminal Justice Services hearing on Thursday, September 27, 2012.

    The New York City Council Committee on Fire and Criminal Justice Services will hold a hearing on Thursday, September 27, 2012 at 1pm in the 14th floor Committee Room at 250 Broadway, in Manhattan, on the following two bills:

    Int. No. 803

    By Council Members Crowley, Oddo, Vacca, Lander, Cabrera, Dromm, Eugene, Ferreras, Foster, James, Koo, Koppell, Koslowitz, Levin, Palma, Rose, Williams, Wills, Weprin, Mendez, Mark-Viverito and Halloran.

    A Local Law to amend the administrative code of the city of New York, in relation to requiring the Department of Correction to make its electronic database of people buried at Hart’s Island, since 1977, available on its website.

     Int. No. 804

    By Council Members Crowley, Oddo, Vacca, Lander, Brewer, Cabrera, Dromm, Eugene, Foster, Jackson, James, Koo, Koppell, Koslowitz, Levin, Palma, Rose, Wills, Mendez, Mark-Viverito and Halloran.

    A Local Law to amend the administrative code of the city of New York, in relation to requiring the Department of Correction to put its Hart’s Island visitation policy in writing, post it on its website, and make it available to anyone who requests a copy.

    Hearings are open to the public. Interested ART members are encouraged to attend. If you wish to testify, please contact hearings@council.nyc.ny.us

    If you would like to receive copies of these bills or advanced copies of testimony, please contact:

    Melinda Hunt
    Director of The Hart Island Project
    Email: hartisland@aol.com

    More information about The Hart Island Project is available via the Current Actions section of the Advocacy Committee website.

  • Wednesday, September 19, 2012 1:19 PM | Deleted user


    A VERY SPECIAL EVENT:

    TOWN HALL WITH HEALTH DEPARTMENT

    JOIN US FOR A DIALOGUE ABOUT VITAL RECORDS


    ASSISTANT COMMISSIONER ELIZABETH BEGIER, MD, MPH,

    DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND MENTAL HYGIENE, BUREAU OF VITAL STATISTICS,

    WILL ANSWER QUESTIONS AND CONCERNS ABOUT NYC VITAL RECORDS


    HOSTED BY:

    Edna Wells Handy, Commissioner, Department of Citywide Administrative Services

    Eileen Flannelly, Deputy Commissioner, Department of Records & Information Services


    WHEN:

    TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2012 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.


    WHERE:

    DEPARTMENT OF RECORDS VISITOR CENTER, 31 Chambers Street, Room 112- LOBBY


    RSVP TO: visitorcenter@records.nyc.gov


    RSVP IS REQUIRED

    (WE REGRET WE CANNOT ACCOMMODATE WALK-INS FOR THIS EVENT)


  • Tuesday, September 18, 2012 10:29 PM | Deleted user

    By Haley Richardson, ART Reporter
    Laurie Duke, Copy Editor

    Curator of Photography Michael Lorenzini discusses some of the fragile photographs being treated at the New York City Department of Records and Information Services Conservation Lab, 12 September 2012. Photograph courtesy Ryan Anthony Donaldson.


    Walking into the new Visitors Center at New York City Department of Records and Information Services (DORIS), one would never guess that the entire exhibition on display there was completed through volunteer work and with a budget of $60,000. It is not only evident that the displays of memorabilia, photographs, and documents were a labor of love, but also truly impressive that this work was achieved despite prohibitive time and monetary constraints.

    I recently spoke with Eileen Flannelly, DORIS Deputy Commissioner, about the hard work that went into creating the Visitors Center.

    Just a year and a half ago, the cluster of rooms adjoining the City Hall Library were little more than a "dumping ground" for the files and paperwork of former staff. Flannelly's idea to turn the unused space into a public space for the viewing of collections materials was met with little enthusiasm and even less monetary support. In response, she rallied her employees who worked together, without financial compensation, to clear out the space, box up important materials, and dispose of unneeded items. When City Hall officials were brought in to inspect the space, their surprise over the progress was clear. With the subsequent help of a $60,000 grant and the support of her superiors, Flannelly tackled the chore of installing lighting, painting walls, locating storage and display furniture, and general sprucing up. Aided by staff members, and led by Personnel Director Naomi Pacheco and Budget Director Barbara Filiberto, the department was able to createundefinedin the span of a single fiscal year and solely through volunteer laborundefineda sparkling space to showcase the story of New York City as told through its official governmental activities.

    Set amidst stunning black and white photographs taken by Eugene de Salignac, gifts given to former Mayors, and an outpost of the NYC City Store, is a sizable media room. In this room, the public can investigate digitized film, video, and audio materials, including thousands of 16-inch lacquer transcription discs and open reel tapes from the vast WNYC sound collection. MJ Robinson, former Curator of Film and Moving Image for the department's WNYC-TV collection, coordinated the creation of this portion of the space.

    Flannelly says the Visitors Center receives traffic not only from tour groups from historical societies, universities, and law schools, but also from high schools, a demographic group with which she is very interested in engaging. In fact, a group of interns recently completed an innovative project using Facebook: each student was assigned a Mayor (Koch, Lindsay, and La Guardia) and assembled a profile consisting of his photos, important events, and reflections. The project was the focus of a recent meeting of the Mayor's Advisory Committee on Social Media.

    In addition to the Visitors Center, DORIS has recently launched, with much fanfare and acclaim, an online gallery of nearly 900,000 photographs documenting every aspect of life in New York City. This project, the product of seven years' worth of work and counting, was led by Curator of Photography Michael Lorenzini. With the help of a long stream of interns and temporary employees, photographs in a variety of formats were selected, cleaned, digitized, described, and preserved, thereby creating a digital gallery of images that has generated so much international interest that it crashed the department’s servers within minutes of press release.

    On September 13, 2012, the Archivists Round Table of Metropolitan New York, Inc. (ART) co-sponsored ART’s monthly program with DORIS, which included a presentation and exclusive tours of the Visitors Center, City Hall Library, and Conservation Lab for over 100 attendees. Many who had visited before were impressed by the transformation that has taken place.

    The general public is welcome to stop by the NYC Department of Records Visitors Center at 31 Chambers Street on Mondays through Thursdays from 9:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. and Fridays from 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. An informational video is available here.


questions? communications@nycarchivists.org

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